Hi, I'm Tae

The short version...

Cheesy as it may sound, I believe that music really can change the world.

 

I use music to inspire, activate, and coordinate resistance to corruption, authoritarianism, white supremacy, patriarchy, and poverty.

 

You can scroll down if you want the longer story.

Hi, I'm Tae

The Short Version

Cheesy as it may sound, I believe that music really can change the world.

 

I use music to inspire, activate, and coordinate resistance to corruption, authoritarianism, white supremacy, patriarchy, and poverty.

 

You can scroll down if you want the longer story.

My name is Tae Phoenix and I’m the child of two worlds. My mother is Latina and my father is Jewish. I like to say this makes me a “challah-peño.”

As a child of mixed heritage, I’ve spent the bulk of my life asking big questions about identity and belonging; so I’m well-attuned to the ways that our backgrounds shape our experiences of the world.

Like many Americans prior to the Presidential election of 2016, I believed that the success of Barack Obama’s presidency meant that our country was fully ready to move forward on civil and human rights. After the election, I saw just how much work we still have to do to build a country where everyone is safe, healthy, and free.

I’ve been political my entire life, and a professional singer songwriter for the past seven years; but it wasn’t until November of 2016 that I really understood what my voice was for. After the election, I began writing the most authentic songs of my life – songs about my promises to myself and my fellow human beings, my hopes for the future, and most immediately, my anger at those Trump voters who could afford not to take politics personally.

That’s partly because Trump’s heartless policies are personal for me. In addition to my ethnic identities, I live with disabilities that will require lifelong medical maintenance. Without the Affordable Care Act, I would not be alive today.

As I began to sing and speak my truth in public, I heard from people all over that my work had lifted their spirits and encouraged them to take action. Over the past two years, I’ve been given the opportunity to organize and perform with activists and artists from every concievable background. Through their stories and our work together, I have learned that my liberation from oppression depends on liberating everyone from all forms of structural oppression.

We are at an inflection point in the course of human history. We have the opportunity to heal the wounds of the past, address the wrongs of the present, and build a future for our species that we will be proud to leave to future generations. All we have to do to achieve that goal is to act with a fierce advocacy for our shared humanity.

That’s the message I hope to convey with my new music video, an adaptation of the classic civil rights protest song “We Shall Not Be Moved.”

“We Shall Not Be Moved” is a collaboration with producer Maurice Jones Jr., vocal director and featured artist Josephine Howell, and filmmaker Lara Lavi-Jones.

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